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The Book Thread
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Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:25:31
aspro said:

Finished Metro 2033 (the book not the game).

It's typical sci-fi pulp.  While you are reading it it is the best thing ever, but the second you finish it you'll never think about it again.

Filled with literary crutches and the end basically makes you think that the author had no idea as to how to end it (plus it gets preachy). Oh and it's full of typs in the last third. My favorite was "misunderstandood"

So, again, if you are playing the game, I completely suggest it, but if not, give it a miss.

http://clatl.com/binary/1953/1367496144-golf-clap.gif

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere  
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst  
Are full of passionate intensity.
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Tue, 24 Dec 2013 02:45:10

Why dont I know what club 33 is?

I bought Dune cause everyone says it is the greatest sci-fi book ever written. So lets see.

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Tue, 24 Dec 2013 02:50:18

Dune is an amazing book. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.  I must not fear.  Fear is the mind killer.

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Tue, 24 Dec 2013 03:22:42
travo said:

Dune is an amazing book. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.  I must not fear.  Fear is the mind killer.

There is some glossary of dune terms in the back, am I supposed to check on those as I read?

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Mon, 30 Dec 2013 06:29:40

I am reading The Kraken Wakes, but foolz, check out the cover on my copy (talk about contrast)


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Mon, 30 Dec 2013 10:24:11
aspro said:

I am reading The Kraken Wakes, but foolz, check out the cover on my copy (talk about contrast)

Geez, you may as well just bin it. Penguin ffs...

You've probably forced me into another double post. Sad

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere  
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst  
Are full of passionate intensity.
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Tue, 31 Dec 2013 07:16:17

89% of the reason i bought the book was based on the cover you posted, the rest on your suggestion.

I mean serioulsy WTF with the cover I got?! It's like being told you are going to Sizzler and then you go open a door and it's fool of a room of fat, bearded men who are there to shoot a Bukake video.

WTF?!

Anyway, I am enjoying the book.


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Thu, 02 Jan 2014 11:05:26

It was a long month. My brain is slow. The latter paragraphs are more fun.

James Joyce: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

Sigh, not even James Joyce can consistently pull of a simile. That aside, the opening is one of the most vivid sensory experiences one can have in literature, and as the intellect develops to stifle just such experiences, emotion and cognition step in to share the burden so that knowledge does not completely suffocate the prose or truth (as Aldous Huxley would say).

C. Willett and Phillis Cunnington (teehee): The History of Underclothes.

The Cunningtons have a great sense of humour, and their early to mid selection of media to help illustrate the underclothing (both in literary and visual forms) in invariably amusing ways. The social analysis they apply to underwear is steeped in stereotype in the best way possible. Unfortunately they are not so self-aware to stop before they were born---drawing the line at, presumably, their adolescence. To make matters worse (as is often the case with histories of this nature) the latter eras become little more shopping catalogue reproductions.  As enjoyable as a cultural or linguistic history as it is one of underwear.

Margaret Balderson: When Jays Fly to Barbmo.

Australian writers are generally excellent at depicting the natural world, regardless of its context or location, and such cultural traits are put to excellent use here, using contrast between the Norwegian seasons to excellent literal (sensory) and metaphorical (emotional) use. The consistent rhythm of the seasons, and the practicalities that are thus required to survive in such an environment give great context to the Nazi invasion; making its upheaval seem all the more simultaneously powerful and meaningless. The painful, wonderful longing and conflicted sense of place that some of mixed ethnicity authenticity might feel is very well realised, too. Naturally it suffers from the same inconsistencies that one can expect from the vast majority of Australian literature, but see above: even James Joyce doesn't know a good simile from a bad one. So nobody's perfect, you snob.

Oh, and it's a total librarian's book (see Bastion for a gaming equivalent, as a critics' artist output is also stereotypically applicable). No, the greatness of books is not that I could empathise with the main characters ethnic plight, but the fact that it contained what I am currently disagreeing with. Oh, and the Oxford Press should be ashamed. One of the worst typeset books I've ever read; there was even a lone word on a new page from the preceding paragraph. And typos were everywhere: presumably not the manuscript's fault. Harvard forever!

Evelyn Waugh: The Loved One.

The first half is utter, irredeemable tripe. Clearly he is a talented user of language, but a very poor artist. His articles must be something to behold, but his stories (well, this one at least) are completely devoid of setting, character, characters or narrative. There are a lot of nicely strung together words which form pleasant, somewhat symmetrical shapes on the page and are pleasant on one's tongue, but are ultimately meaningless, shallow and without any sense of tangibility. The second half of the book is not so bad: by then the only three characters of the story have taken on some genuine form, probably only through sheer repetition. Hugely disappointing and dull.

Allison Morgan: Bright-Eye.

Apparently I have developed reading stamina, a requirement according to the back of the book. Very well written, and illustrated. But what about the poor old dog? That cunt better take her to see the duck. Hrm

Naomi Lewis: The Magic Doll and Other Short Stories.

Not written (she retold a fairy tale and translated Hans Christian Anderson, though), but compiled by Naomi Lewis (and illustrated by Harold Jones who draws in colour; so it's probably not a good idea to PRINT THE FUCKING PICTURES IN BLACK AND WHITE!). An excellent compilation, though as one might expect from short stories, all but a few stories share the exact same mode of writing: here it is mercifully that of the fairy tale or biblical repetition style. However, the two highlights do not fall into this mode at all. The first is Gertrude's Child by Richard Hughes (of A High Wind in Jamaica fame) which has almost as much feverish power of persuasion as The Wizard of Oz. The second is A Departure by Kenneth Grahame (I need not introduce him, right?) which is pretty much a perfect short story. The language is superb, the structure designed to compliment this length of writing rather than be reluctantly at its mercy, and it's also the only story that is written in an impartial voice which is not that of a young child or an adult presenting something to a child. Not something that this makes it superior to the other stories, but something worth noting nevertheless.

Edited: Thu, 02 Jan 2014 11:26:34
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere  
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst  
Are full of passionate intensity.
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Thu, 09 Jan 2014 17:58:54

I just finished reading Inferno and started Ringworld.

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Sat, 11 Jan 2014 08:46:29
SteelAttack said:

I just finished reading Inferno and started Ringworld.

I loved her work in Breakfast Club.

I finished The Kraken Wakes and Rise of the Triffids. Both good reads, I would read them in that order. English apocalypse literature. Wonderful stuff.


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Wed, 15 Jan 2014 04:09:54

I just finished reading Death Note Vol. 1. Damn good manga so far.

death note

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Wed, 15 Jan 2014 08:03:26
Ravenprose said:

I just finished reading Death Note Vol. 1. Damn good manga so far.

death note

I have them all. It's gets ...less great... in the second act. But gets better at the end.

Misa-Misa.


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Mon, 20 Jan 2014 02:15:11

I'm currently reading Death Note Vol, 4.

Misa is awesome! LOL I'm loving this series so far. Happy

Edited: Mon, 20 Jan 2014 02:34:53

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Mon, 20 Jan 2014 02:18:35

It really is good. But be advised, google image search of Misa will get you arrested or at the very least on lists.

Ex-Mrs.Aspro took all the manga (file under, She Got the Goldmine, I Got The Shaft).


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Mon, 20 Jan 2014 02:22:40

What? I only searched Death Note Vol 4 for that cover image.

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Mon, 20 Jan 2014 02:24:44
Ravenprose said:

What? I only searched Death Note Vol 4 for that cover image.

My advice was anticipatory. I was advising against future searches of misa-misa. It;s going to get you on lists if you do.


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Mon, 20 Jan 2014 02:27:27
aspro said:

My advice was anticipatory. I was advising against future searches of misa-misa. It;s going to get you on lists if you do.

I never considered it, but thanks for the warning, Aspro.

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Wed, 29 Jan 2014 12:49:45

I've just finished "The Dragonbone Chair" by Tad Williams. Not sure if I'll get the rest of the series yet. I'm finally getting back into reading and this may become my best year of reading since 2007.

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Wed, 29 Jan 2014 13:06:59
Té_Rojo said:

I've just finished "The Dragonbone Chair" by Tad Williams. Not sure if I'll get the rest of the series yet. I'm finally getting back into reading and this may become my best year of reading since 2007.

I remember really enjoying that series.  It's been so long ago that I can't recall anything about those books anymore, other than that I thought them to be very good.

I've just started re-reading the whole Song of Fire and Ice series again, after having bought them all in English.  Currently on page 320 of the first book.

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Wed, 05 Feb 2014 03:05:52

I'm hoping I'll really get into the series with the second book, but I think I'll get that one later in the year.

I finished "The Infernal City" by Greg Keyes, which is an Elder Scrolls novel. I got it and its sequel from pre-ordering Skyrim so I thought I should try them. Going from The Dragonbone Chair to The Infernal City was interesting. It was very mildly enjoyable but that's about what I expected.

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